(new) Hawaii Five-0 on CBS

the new Hawaii Five-0 on CBS


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“Ahuwale ka nane hūnā” – Harry Langford (Chris Vance) enlists McGarrett and Danny’s help to track down Lady Sophie (Alana Boden), a teenage British royal who has run away while under his protection. Also, Grover, Tani and Junior work a 25-year-old murder case after a mysterious Betamax tape arrives at 5-0 headquarters, on HAWAII FIVE-0, Friday, April 20 (9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

(“Ahuwale ka nane hūnā” is Hawaiian for “The Answer to the Riddle is Seen”)

I’m really looking forward to see Harry again. I like him! And I love the understanding Steve and Harry have for each other. Very cool team.

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REGULAR CAST:
Alex O’Loughlin (Steve McGarrett)
Scott Caan (Danny “Danno” Williams)
Chi McBride (Lou Grover)
Jorge Garcia (Jerry Ortega)
Ian Anthony Dale (Adam Noshimuri)
Meaghan Rath (Tani Rey)
Beulah Koale (Junior Reigns)
Taylor Wily (Kamekona)
Kimee Balmilero (Noelani Cunha)
Dennis Chun (Sgt. Duke Lukela)

RECURRING CAST:
Chris Vance (Harry Langford)

GUEST CAST:
Alana Boden (Lady Sophie)
Kate Beahan (Lady Helen)
Saul Rollason (Lord Mortimer)
Scott Speiser (James Hollis)
Adam Burnett (Dean)
Camille Claire Hendricks (Blonde #1)
Adam Scott Miller (Travis)
Darren Richardson (Paparazzi)
Mariko Van Kampen (Alice Dubbins)
Arienne Mandi (Carlotta)
Ryan Okinaka (Driver)
LeGrand Lawrence (Manager)
Taniya Sifton (Sophie Look-Alike)
Susan Berk (Anne Hoff)
DB Warren (Nick Hoff)
Kaipu Seales (Dude)

WRITTEN BY: David Wolkove & Matt Wheeler
DIRECTED BY: Eagle Egilsson

Thanks to CBS for the info!

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An action-packed 45 minutes starts with the unveiling of FBI Special Agent Douglas Fischer, who is in Hawaii to lead a task force fighting gang-related crime, and to “restore peace and tranquility” on Oahu. I thought that was Steve’s job, so it all sounds as if the Five-0 has rather taken its collective eye off the ball. No matter; Fischer hasn’t even finished unpacking before he and his family are assassinated.

A quick jump back 24 hours, and Fischer and his partner Agent McNeal are at Tani’s door, looking for her help. They’ve examined the timeline, you see, and they’ve concluded that the upsurge in gang violence coincided with two things: the murder of Michelle Shioma, and the return to the island of Adam Noshimuri. HELL yes, thought one viewer. Is someone finally working out that Adam – who is, let’s not forget, not only “former” Yakuza but a convicted double killer as well – is dodgy as hell? Steve, however, is very much not happy with the FBI’s attempt to recruit one of his team as an undercover FBI grass.

And forward again: Steve’s response to the slaying of Fischer is to order the rounding-up of every single organised gang figure on Oahu. The Five-0 can’t do it all by themselves, mind you, so they get some help from HPD… and the National Guard. Yes, it’s martial law on the streets of Honolulu. Even Eddie the Dog lends a paw (and gets an “On me!” from Steve during a raid. Sadly, he doesn’t bark “Copy that!” in response). They eventually pull in over 150 organised crime figures, one of whom is an ex-boyfriend of Tani’s.

While that’s all going on, Agent McNeal brings Adam in, although only until Steve finds out. Were McNeal not so very, very, very obviously a baddie, I’d totally be on his side. Because, yet again, Adam’s conduct has been highly dubious: he’s revealed as having visited Michelle Shioma in prison no more than 24 hours before her death, which he unconvincingly explains away as having been prompted by curiosity when she contacted him. Oh, and she offered Adam information about himself, which of course he wasn’t interested in, because he didn’t want to be in her debt.

Steve accepts all of this at face value, and anyway he needs Adam’s help to track the new number 1 suspect for the gang warfare: Kenzo, who is Shioma’s successor at the head of the Oahu Yakuza. But the Five-0 can’t relax for a second, because while they’re bracing Kenzo there’s an armed raid on the “rendition facility” – really, guys? Really? – where the gangsters are being held, and some of the top-value prisoners are executed. The perps escape, so by the end we still don’t know who started the gang war, or who killed Agent Fischer, or who raided the, uh, “rendition facility”. Steve, however, has a plan: he asks Adam to head up a special organised crime task force. “Will this task force be for or against it?” Adam doesn’t ask. Of course, he accepts, and the fox is in charge of the henhouse. I thought this was one of the best episodes of the season.

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At long last it is Friday the 30th of March and time for Episode 8:18 of Hawaii Five-0 with Alex as Director ……

A powerful storyline motivates his approach to Hawaii Five-0’s “E ho’okō kuleana (To Do One’s Duty).”

Fans of Hawaii Five-0 know Steve McGarrett as an action hero and strong leader for the team. Alex O’Loughlin has always looked like a natural commander when he plays the role on screen. Now he’s taking command in a whole new way—by directing the episode “E ho’okō kuleana (To Do One’s Duty),” which airs on Friday, Mar. 30 at 9/8c on CBS and CBS All Access.

CBS

29 March 2018

Alex was humble about his first experience as a television director, but he didn’t shy away from the responsibility. The episode’s storyline about domestic violence motivated his careful approach. In an interview with CBS.com, Alex shared what it was like behind the scenes as he directed his fellow Hawaii Five-0 stars, the ways a good crew can make TV magic, and just how he turned tropical Honolulu into chilly Newark. Enjoy his perspective from the director’s chair along with some exclusive behind-the-scenes photos.

CBS: Congratulations on your directorial debut! Is there any way you tried to leave your personal “stamp” on this episode?

Alex: It’s weird to talk about being a director. I’ve done one episode of my own show, that I’m very comfortable on and fully supported by every single crew member. Part of my head is saying to me, “you’re not a director yet.” I just needed to qualify that!

I didn’t come in to this trying to reinvent the wheel. I didn’t want to try to make a different show. I wanted to make Hawaii Five-0. I just wanted to tell the story truthfully.

Stylistically, there’s a yes and a no. There was a lot of material to get into a 42-minute bracket. My director’s cut was different to the final cut in the sense that I actually cut a few scenes loose to let other scenes breathe. In television, the cuts are so quick: bang-bang-bang-bang-bang! I want to shoot two people and sit there for eight minutes and watch them. I’ve got a lot to learn about television and about the best ways to tell stories directorially in that medium.

CBS: What do you want audiences to take away from this episode?

Alex: The heartbeat of this story is a domestic violence against women story.

Joanna [Christie] wasn’t an actor who was sent to me from the company. I searched her out because I’d seen her onNarcos and I thought she’d be fantastic for it. She agreed to do it and I was beyond thrilled. I was really humbled and moved that she would trust me to be her director—as a first time director. I got her on the phone right away, and she was such a collaborator. I feel she told the story beautifully. She’s really talented. She’s got such an open heart. We were both on the same page right away: that we’ve got a really important story to tell.

There are millions of women all around the world who are being perpetrated against. There are millions of women all around the world who are in dangerous, terrifying situations. It’s up to us as storytellers to give people hope, to let people know that there is a way out. It felt like I was handed a great responsibility, and I took it very seriously. I hope that I was able to tell that story with the truth and integrity that those women around the world, who we are representing, deserve.

CBS: What was it like working with actors you may already know well, but now from the other side of the camera?

Alex: That was the most exciting aspect!

I loved being the master and commander of every moving part. I love painting the picture. I got to detail the scenes. I got to build the set and choose the paint colors, and say “Hey, can we get one of these? And do this? And can it do this? And can it make a little sound?” That was a lot of fun being the architect of everything visceral in the story, all the tangible stuff. But working with the people was the greatest part.

I love actors, man! I didn’t know I love actors as much as I do. These people are willing to open up their heart and their soul and tell these incredible, emotional stories on behalf of other people from such a truthful place. It sort of stunned me a little bit, because I’ve never been behind the camera and been the guy calling the shots.

CBS: There’s a scene where you and Ian Anthony Dale have some really intense dialogue. How do you approach directing somebody you’re in a scene with, and how do you direct yourself?

Alex:Ian is amazing. First of all, he looks like a movie star. He’s so handsome. He’s so talented. He’s such a collaborator. He’s a charming guy and such a pleasure to work with. I really hope we have him around for a long time.

When I got to my scenes, of which there were way more than I thought there would be, I was like “What?” I mean, I kind of knew my lines, but I felt like working with Alex O’Loughlin was the one part of the experience I didn’t need to replicate. I was like, “Can we cut this guy out?”Everyone else was a dream!

CBS: Did you have to run back-and-forth to check the cameras, too?

Alex: I have playback [via on-set monitors] on the entire show. Which is good, because I move fast as a director. I think it’s from so many years in television that I observe everybody’s time and the timeline of the show. I know how busy everyone is and how tired everyone is. You’re real exhausted at that stage. It’s episode 18, so you’re deep in the season, deep in the show itself. I try to move really fast and those scenes forced me to move even faster. It felt a little manic inside of my head during those moments. No one else seemed manic, but you have seven irons in the fire instead of four or five when you’re in the scene as well.

CBS: Is there a difference with how you approach each actor?

Alex: All the guest stars were extraordinary. Joanna [Christie] and Daniel [Kaemon]were fantastic. They were so responsive and they’re both really great actors. I got the performances out of them that I wanted. I really didn’t have to do much. They brought so much to the table, I just made a couple of adjustments and steered in certain direction, but they did all the work.

My fellow Five-0cast were all wonderful, too. I think you need to know the people. Directing Scott [Caan] is way different to directing Beulah [Koale], is way different to directing Meaghan [Rath], is way different to directing Chi [McBride].

You make adjustments the actor you’re working with requires, and then it’s show time. You realize as a director you’ve got to be fluid. You’ve got to listen and really pay attention to what the actor is telling you. I may go to an actor and say “Hey, listen, how do you feel about this, and trying it this way? Is there a world where your character would do that?”And they may start asking questions, like, “Why would I do that? That doesn’t make sense.”And then it’s up to me to question my motivation, to actually answer the question.

There were times when I stopped and thought fast on my feet and I was like, “You know what? You’re right. I don’t know why your character would do that. This doesn’t have to do with your character’s motivation. This has to do with me trying to make it pretty. This is shot design.” Other times they say, “Yeah, it’s a really good note, thank you.”

I think the lessons were: Don’t be precious; be really clear; tell your story; know the story that you’re telling; and if you can’t tell it the way you thought you were going to tell it, find another way to tell it. I think I’m a fluid person and I think it served me well.

CBS: Anything else you learned as a director?

Alex: There were a thousand lessons that I learned! It was the best experience. [One was] how different every single actor is, whether you work with them every day or whether they’re a guest star.

[Another lesson was] what people’s interpretations of your words are. You can say “blue” and some people hear you say “pink.” You learn on the fly who hears what when you say what you say, and making adjustments so they hear what you want them to hear, so you can tell the story you want to tell the story. It sounds manipulative, but it’s not. It’s more about communication.

CBS: Was it tricky portraying a city like Newark in such a distinctive place like Hawaii?

Alex: Yeah, it’s really, really tricky. First of all, to find anything in Honolulu that looks like a Newarkskyline is virtually impossible. To find a property, to find a residential structure that doesn’t have a shingled roof, that resembles anything on the eastern seaboard is extremely difficult. To find a property that doesn’t have a palm tree in the front? There are no palm trees in Newark! We had to hedge our bets. There is no perfect situation here. I had to paint a couple trees out, I had to paint a couple skylines in. We scouted heavy for it, too.

The night stuff, I had them wet everything down so it made it feel seasonal in the sense that there’s still a lot of moisture on the ground. Trying to put the people in jackets and stuff where I could in the night scenes, and in slightly warmer looking layers in the day scenes, and trying to create an environment with other scenes. Also, we changed camera filters, the way we light things, sometimes the way people move

When Scott’swaiting for Ray in the car, and they get in a violent altercation (the beginning of how Ray was incarcerated), that scene felt really cold to me. That did feel like it could have been on the East Coast. I had Daniel come out and feel the air, he sort of rubbed his hands together a bit, he had big boots on.

Of course, I have to say Kurt Jones, my DP who just got nominated for a gigantic award, is so talented. He’s such a great guy. He’s so fast. He’s extraordinary. I think he’s going to be a hall of famer.

CBS: What was it like directing a car (and foot!) action scene, and how does it compare to directing other scenes?

Alex: It’s a different thing. Action is action. You either know how to do it or you don’t know how to do it.

I had extraordinary help around me. [Stunt coordinator] Eric Norris is so awesome. And Paul Lacovara, my double, who is also coordinating now, is so awesome. I can really hand it over to them and go,“‘Boys, do your thing.”

I think as an action director, it comes kind of naturally to me to a certain extent, because I’ve done so much action, myself—as my MRIs would suggest!

It’s almost like a genre within a genre. I did find myself going, “I put my action hat on now.” I start thinking in different terms. Then, when I’m working with people, that felt more like “directing” to me. I don’t want to suggest all the giant action directors in the world aren’t directors at all. I wonder what they would say, what the Michael Bays and Peter Bergs would say. It feels like they’re different elements, like you step into a different set of shoes.

I guess the baseline is that action is the external elements, and directing actors in scenes is internal. One goes out, one goes in.

Watch “E ho’okō kuleana (To Do One’s Duty),” Alex’s directorial debut for Hawaii Five-0, on Friday, Mar. 30 at 9/8c on CBS and CBS All Access.

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Another great interview with Alex.

We think that he gives a lot of good answers to some of the questions and assumptions that has been hanging around the fandom this week. And there are not really any biased assumptions and statements by the interviewer – only clear answers by Alex. Although I guess many would find some sort of way to twist it again to suit their gripes …..

Alex O’Loughlin Reveals Why He’s Changing His Tune About Leaving ‘Hawaii Five-0’ (Exclusive)

The 41-year-old star, who has valiantly led the Five-0 team as Steve McGarrett, makes his directorial debut with Friday’s season eight episode of the CBS action drama, stepping behind the camera for the first time in his career.

By Philiana Ng‍

For: ET

In the installment, titled “E Ho’Oko Kuleana (To One’s Duty),” the ex-wife of the man who shot Danny (Scott Caan)in an early season eight episode finds her way to Oahu, kicking off a slew of flashbacks to a time when the actions of a younger Danny, living in New Jersey at the time, helped save her life. While Danny’s past comes back to roost, Tani (Meaghan Rath)and Junior (Beulah Koale)patrol the island, providing levity to an action-packed hour, and Adam (Ian Anthony Dale) is framed for the murder of the crime boss he’s been hot on the heels of.

Ahead of the episode’s premiere, ET jumped on the phone with O’Loughlin for a candid conversation about his directorial debut, why he’s backtracking on comments he made about his desire to step away from Hawaii Five-0 after the current season and the “trickiest” part about directing himself.

ET: Friday’s episode of Hawaii Five-0 marks the first time you’ll be credited as a director in your career. How would you describe the experience stepping behind the camera versus being in front of it?

Alex: It was super exciting. It was very different in the sense that when I’m in front of [the cameras], I try to make all the cameras disappear and all the strange people holding things around me just go away. That suspension of disbelief that’s required as an actor to live truthfully in imaginary circumstances is different to what needs to happen as a director, in the sense that you are the master of all the moving parts. You create the world in every detail. But it was thrilling. It was fantastic. It’s something I really hope I can do more of in my life because I enjoyed it very much.

ET: You’ve been working in the industry for a while. Why did now feel like the right time for you to take the directing plunge?

Alex: I think my career is still a work in progress. There are many things I want to do, so many people I want to work with, so many different opportunities out there as an actor. It’s a really good question. Fundamentally, on this show, it took me years and years and years to get my workload down to a point where I could even conceptualize doing something like directing, because it takes a lot of time and a lot of energy.

I know myself — I don’t do anything half-a**ed — so I think I did a hundred prep hours on this thing, almost like a bit of a psycho; I was a little OCD with it. It was by chance that [the opportunity] came this late on this show. When I started, I don’t think I was ever a good actor — I’m not saying I’m a good actor now, but this show has been a master class in acting. I think I’ve grown as an actor on this show, [and] I wanted to do that first.

ET: What was the most challenging part about directing?

Alex: The trickiest thing for me was dealing with myself, to be totally honest. I didn’t do as much acting preparation as I would’ve liked to or as I always do, so I was a little frustrated as an actor and also as a director. I was sort of racing back and forth from when I’d act a scene and then I’d call “cut” and then I’d race back to the monitor to watch the playback of my work, which I didn’t really care about. I just wanted to get me out of the way so I could focus on all of these great actors I was working with. I was annoyed at and with myself. [Laughs] But everything else was great.

ET: This may be a difficult question for you to answer, but how is Alex the director different from Alex the actor?

Alex: That’s an interesting question. There are some big differences. When I’m working as an actor, I want to be left alone and I have to go inward to get to the work that I’ve done, if that makes sense. But as a director, I’m much more gregarious and running around [on set] — “Hey, I’m so glad we’re doing this!” — fiddling with all the cameras and lights. It’s not that I feel more like a collaborator when I’m directing, but I feel like the collaboration when you work as an actor is more unsaid, it’s more unsuspecting. You are a cog in the machine and you just focus on your part. As a director, you’re focusing on all the cogs and on all the sums of the [whole] part.

ET: You had the opportunity to direct major emotional beats in the episode, as well as a big action sequence and flashbacks with Scott. What was the most difficult for you to execute?

Alex: The action’s second nature to me. I know how to do action and make it action-y. [Laughs] The thing that was most exciting to me was working with actors. Working with [guest stars] Joanna [Christie] and Daniel [Kaemon] was great. To have the permission to climb down into the foxhole with these actors where they live and do all their hard, dirty, emotional work and sit with them quietly and go, “Hey, listen, how do you feel about this? Do you trust me to take this [scene] this way?” That sort of stuff was really beautiful because I’ve had that relationship from the other side with a handful of wonderful directors over the years who care about the human condition. I care about story, man. I care about the human journey. To have these amazing actors give me the encouragement to be a part of what they’re doing, to help them make choices, that was really, really amazing and very fulfilling.

ET: We also see McGarrettplaying the guitar early on in the episode, which is a nice nod for fans of the show, and you get to share the scene with Jimmy Buffett. Talk me through filming that moment.

Alex: Oh yeah, that was rad! [Laughs] It’s funny, that Portuguese guitar — I’ve played guitar my whole life, but that was impossible to play. So someone had to come in and string it like a normal guitar because none of us [had experience playing it]. I cheated a little bit and had them restring it so I could play it like a human. That was fun. It was a bizarre, funny little moment to have Jimmy Buffett with his bare feet up in McGarrett’s office. It was nice. For the most part, it’s a pretty dense, serious episode, so those little parts are deeply important relief moments.

ET: In the April 13 episode, McGarrett’sex, Catherine, comes back into the fray. What can you tease about Michelle Borth’s return?

Alex: It was great to see Michelle and it was cool to pick up where we left off. It’s a great action, travel-y episode with McGarrett and Catherine.It’s also nice to see these two sharing the same space for a minute and to explore how they feel about each other, how everything is cool [between them].

It was weird for a minute, the way she left — somebody who’s about to get proposed to and they choose an allegiance to the government and national security. It was a big blow for McGarrett. I think this episode served as a gentle closure and reinstated the friendship between the two of them, which was really important.

ET: Last time we spoke, you were adamant about Hawaii Five-0 season eight being your last. We’re now approaching the end of the season. Do you still feel the same way about your future on the show?

Alex: I’m opening the door a little bit. A big part of this is that my back injury is doing a lot better after my stem cell treatments. It’s a big deal when you hurt your spine; it’s one thing to get your teeth knocked out or have torn ligaments and tendons, but that injury really scared me.

A couple of years ago, part of my reality was if this stays this way, I can’t [do this anymore]. What are going to do, Ironside? Put me in a wheelchair? That sort of shifted a little bit. It’s the end of a very long season and we’re almost at 200 episodes. It’s tough for me to think about coming back to work right now, but I’m open to negotiations. I haven’t heard much but yeah, I’m open to it.

ET: Could there be a situation where former stars Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park returned at some point for a final farewell? Has there been any internal talk about that?

Alex: I haven’t listened to any talk about any of that stuff. All I know is they left and we got two new fantastic young actors who want to be here. It’s sort of made a massive difference on the show. We had a long relationship with those other guys and they decided they didn’t want to be here anymore and now we’ve got two people who want to be here. I don’t know what it’s like on the outside and I don’t read all the news either, but from the inside, it’s been a charming adjustment. That’s probably part of why I’m more open to coming back as well.

The boys relaxing onset and watching a YouTube video

ET: So you’d be interested in discussions for a potential ninth season? (Note: CBShas yet to renew Hawaii Five-0.)

Alex: I’m way more open than I used to be but again, I don’t know if we’re even close to making a deal so it still might not happen. So we’ll see.

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Alex O’Loughlin Reveals Why He’s Changing His Tune About Leaving ‘Hawaii Five-0’

Alex O’Loughlin is adding another title to his all-encompassing Hawaii Five-0 resume.

The 41-year-old star, who has valiantly led the Five-0 team as Steve McGarrett, makes his directorial debut with Friday’s season eight episode of the CBS action drama, stepping behind the camera for the first time in his career.

In the installment, titled “E Ho’Oko Kuleana (To One’s Duty),” the ex-wife of the man who shot Danny (Scott Caan) in an early season eight episode finds her way to Oahu, kicking off a slew of flashbacks to a time when the actions of a younger Danny, living in New Jersey at the time, helped save her life. While Danny’s past comes back to roost, Tani (Meaghan Rath) and Junior (Beulah Koale) patrol the island, providing levity to an action-packed hour, and Adam (Ian Anthony Dale) is framed for the murder of the crime boss he’s been hot on the heels of.

Ahead of the episode’s premiere, ET jumped on the phone with O’Loughlin for a candid conversation about his directorial debut, why he’s backtracking on comments he made about his desire to step away from Hawaii Five-0 after the current season and the “trickiest” part about directing himself.

My thoughts are at the end of the interview. Also the link to the original site at the end of the interview.

ET: Friday’s episode of Hawaii Five-0 marks the first time you’ll be credited as a director in your career. How would you describe the experience stepping behind the camera versus being in front of it?

Alex O’Loughlin: It was super exciting. It was very different in the sense that when I’m in front of [the cameras], I try to make all the cameras disappear and all the strange people holding things around me just go away. That suspension of disbelief that’s required as an actor to live truthfully in imaginary circumstances is different to what needs to happen as a director, in the sense that you are the master of all the moving parts. You create the world in every detail. But it was thrilling. It was fantastic. It’s something I really hope I can do more of in my life because I enjoyed it very much.

You’ve been working in the industry for a while. Why did now feel like the right time for you to take the directing plunge?

I think my career is still a work in progress. There are many things I want to do, so many people I want to work with, so many different opportunities out there as an actor. It’s a really good question. Fundamentally, on this show, it took me years and years and years to get my workload down to a point where I could even conceptualize doing something like directing, because it takes a lot of time and a lot of energy. I know myself — I don’t do anything half-a**ed — so I think I did a hundred prep hours on this thing, almost like a bit of a psycho; I was a little OCD with it. It was by chance that [the opportunity] came this late on this show. When I started, I don’t think I was ever a good actor — I’m not saying I’m a good actor now, but this show has been a master class in acting. I think I’ve grown as an actor on this show, [and] I wanted to do that first.

What was the most challenging part about directing?

The trickiest thing for me was dealing with myself, to be totally honest. I didn’t do as much acting preparation as I would’ve liked to or as I always do, so I was a little frustrated as an actor and also as a director. I was sort of racing back and forth from when I’d act a scene and then I’d call “cut” and then I’d race back to the monitor to watch the playback of my work, which I didn’t really care about. I just wanted to get me out of the way so I could focus on all of these great actors I was working with. I was annoyed at and with myself. [Laughs] But everything else was great.

This may be a difficult question for you to answer, but how is Alex the director different from Alex the actor?

That’s an interesting question. There are some big differences. When I’m working as an actor, I want to be left alone and I have to go inward to get to the work that I’ve done, if that makes sense. But as a director, I’m much more gregarious and running around [on set] — “Hey, I’m so glad we’re doing this!” — fiddling with all the cameras and lights. It’s not that I feel more like a collaborator when I’m directing, but I feel like the collaboration when you work as an actor is more unsaid, it’s more unsuspecting. You are a cog in the machine and you just focus on your part. As a director, you’re focusing on all the cogs and on all the sums of the [whole] part.

You had the opportunity to direct major emotional beats in the episode, as well as a big action sequence and flashbacks with Scott. What was the most difficult for you to execute?

The action’s second nature to me. I know how to do action and make it action-y. [Laughs] The thing that was most exciting to me was working with actors. Working with [guest stars] Joanna [Christie] and Daniel [Kaemon] was great. To have the permission to climb down into the foxhole with these actors where they live and do all their hard, dirty, emotional work and sit with them quietly and go, “Hey, listen, how do you feel about this? Do you trust me to take this [scene] this way?” That sort of stuff was really beautiful because I’ve had that relationship from the other side with a handful of wonderful directors over the years who care about the human condition. I care about story, man. I care about the human journey. To have these amazing actors give me the encouragement to be a part of what they’re doing, to help them make choices, that was really, really amazing and very fulfilling.

We also see McGarrett playing the guitar early on in the episode, which is a nice nod for fans of the show, and you get to share the scene with Jimmy Buffett. Talk me through filming that moment.

Oh yeah, that was rad! [Laughs] It’s funny, that Portuguese guitar — I’ve played guitar my whole life, but that was impossible to play. So someone had to come in and string it like a normal guitar because none of us [had experience playing it]. I cheated a little bit and had them restring it so I could play it like a human. That was fun. It was a bizarre, funny little moment to have Jimmy Buffett with his bare feet up in McGarrett’s office. It was nice. For the most part, it’s a pretty dense, serious episode, so those little parts are deeply important relief moments.

In the April 13 episode, McGarrett’s ex, Catherine, comes back into the fray. What can you tease about Michelle Borth’s return?

It was great to see Michelle and it was cool to pick up where we left off. It’s a great action, travel-y episode with McGarrett and Catherine. It’s also nice to see these two sharing the same space for a minute and to explore how they feel about each other, how everything is cool [between them]. It was weird for a minute, the way she left — somebody who’s about to get proposed to and they choose an allegiance to the government and national security. It was a big blow for McGarrett. I think this episode served as a gentle closure and reinstated the friendship between the two of them, which was really important.

H50-8-20-014

Last time we spoke, you were adamant about Hawaii Five-0 season eight being your last. We’re now approaching the end of the season. Do you still feel the same way about your future on the show?

I’m opening the door a little bit. A big part of this is that my back injury is doing a lot better after my stem cell treatments. It’s a big deal when you hurt your spine; it’s one thing to get your teeth knocked out or have torn ligaments and tendons, but that injury really scared me. A couple of years ago, part of my reality was if this stays this way, I can’t [do this anymore]. What are going to do, Ironside? Put me in a wheelchair? That sort of shifted a little bit. It’s the end of a very long season and we’re almost at 200 episodes. It’s tough for me to think about coming back to work right now, but I’m open to negotiations. I haven’t heard much but yeah, I’m open to it.

Could there be a situation where former stars Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park returned at some point for a final farewell? Has there been any internal talk about that?

I haven’t listened to any talk about any of that stuff. All I know is they left and we got two new fantastic young actors who want to be here. It’s sort of made a massive difference on the show. We had a long relationship with those other guys and they decided they didn’t want to be here anymore and now we’ve got two people who want to be here. I don’t know what it’s like on the outside and I don’t read all the news either, but from the inside, it’s been a charming adjustment. That’s probably part of why I’m more open to coming back as well.

So you’d be interested in discussions for a potential ninth season? (Note: CBS has yet to renew Hawaii Five-0.)

I’m way more open than I used to be but again, I don’t know if we’re even close to making a deal so it still might not happen. So we’ll see.


Read the original post HERE.


I am kinda sad that Alex still doesn’t seem to realize what a fantastic acting job he does week after week. I might be biased, but none of the others on the show comes even close.

I must say I am not looking forward to one part of this episode. I have zero interest in the Danny story. I simply don’t care about Danny’s past, or who the heck wanted to kill him. Zero interest. And for me, it’s very unfortunate that this is the episode that Alex got to direct.

I’m sure he did a great job, and the show will be good. Well, at least two parts of it. I will watch it with an open mind, but honestly, I simply can’t see that story changing my mind about Detective Williams.

I am delighted about his words about Michelle and of course even more so about Catherine. He is so right. Only on the basis of being friends can you create a relationship. And I am looking forward to seeing more of her in the future. Anyone believing this will be it for these two must live on another planet. But believe what you want.

And I feel the same about the two actors who left last season. They decided to go, new ones came. End of story. Don’t make more of it than it really was. And I am very happy with the new guys. It was time for a change.

I strongly believe in a season 9. Bring it on. Hopefully with more influence by Alex, which would mean way better stories than we got in season 8.

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