(new) Hawaii Five-0 on CBS

the new Hawaii Five-0 on CBS


There will be a Sunset on the Beach, after all. CBS Television Studios announced Nov. 10 as the date for its annual Sunset on the Beach featuring the cast of “Hawaii Five-0” at Queen’s Beach in Waikiki.

The cast and crew of “Hawaii Five-0” will once again walk the red carpet at Waikiki Beach for an annual Sunset on the Beach screening.

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And Hawaii News Now

“We are thrilled to once again announce that Hawaii Five-0 will be at Sunset on the Beach in beautiful Waikiki on Nov. 10,” said executive producer Peter Lenkov in a statement.

It won’t be a season premiere like in previous years, but fans will still gather around the big screen to watch a brand new episode from the show’s eighth season.

Since the event will be taking place on Veterans Day weekend, veterans and active duty members of the military are invited to attend as special guests.

“This annual event is a highlight of our year, when the cast and crew get to bring our show directly to fans and friends worldwide,” said Executive Producer Peter Lenkov, in a statement. “This year, in honor of Veterans Day, we will dedicate this event to America’s real heroes who inspire us and our show each and every day.”

Thousands of fans from Hawaii and all over the world have flocked to Queen’s Surf Beach in what’s become an annual tradition. Many of the show’s cast and crew members have also stopped onto the red carpet to greet fans and join the festivities.

“Hawaii Five-0” stars expected to attend include Alex O’Loughlin, Scott Caan, Ian Anthony Dale, Meaghan Rath, Beulah Koale, Chi McBride, Jorge Garcia, Taylor Wily, Kimee Balmilero and Dennis Chun.

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OK, so maybe Hilarie Burton isn’t TV’s cutest DEA agent.

In tonight’s episode of Hawaii Five-0 (titled “Nā lā ‘īlio”/”Dog Days” and airing on CBS at 9/8c), McGarrett & Co. meet Eddie, a recently injured police dog who is the only witness to an ambushed drug bust.

In the sneak peek above, Five-0 works with SWAT and the DEA (Eddie included!) to sniff out the location of a drug stash. But before they do, everyone must give their colleague cop a pat on the head for good luck. Which team member is juuuust a bit reluctant to do so? Press play above to find out.

Elsewhere in the episode, McGarrett is visited by Junior Reigns (played by new series regular Beulah Koale), a former SEAL who is looking to join the task force — but who probably doesn’t get paid in kibble.

Want scoop on H50, or for any other show? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and your question may be answered via Matt’s Inside Line.

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This won’t be a full review, or even any kind of an actual review. Since iTunes took forever to offer H50, I wasn’t able to really watch it before Tuesday. And since I am leaving for a vacation this Friday, I won’t post a review for the episode. And probably not for the next couple of episodes either, but we’ll see.

But please feel free to discuss it. I will make a post on Sunday, so that you can also discuss 8.02 which will actually be 8.03.

So, what did I think about the season premiere?

Well, I was thrilled to see Steve again. Large and in charge. That was great.

I like Tani, although so far she really doesn’t have her own character. Feels like a mix of Chin and Kono. But I will wait and watch what they will make of her. She sure has potential.

Have they listened to the hundreds of comments on various entertainment sites about the unbearable whiny sidekick? Because… <drum roll here> this Danny I liked. I hope Dannoying stays off the islands and we can keep this version. It is still very hard to listen to SC without yelling for him to use some kind of speech rhythm, but that has nothing to do with the character.

The restaurant idea. Ugh, give me a break. One question about it just to make it real. How in the world would they be able to even finance that place? That this will be a year-long project is ridiculous.

I liked the action, and the fights. But honestly, this episode had no real story, no purpose. What the heck was all this about? Sorry, but there have been way better season openers in the previous years. I am really glad there was no SOTB for this kind of premiere. There was nothing spectacular or great about it. But it wasn’t bad either.

All in all it was an OK episode for me. I had fun watching it. And isn’t that what the show should be about? Fun watching it?

For now, that is enough for me.

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With some new pictures from this GQ photoshoot of 2011 surfacing this week, we realised that we have never added the actual article in our archives. Here it is now, together with some of the most incredibly sexy pictures ever taken of Alex.
Credits for the sources of the pictures and fanart are on the pictures.
Over the years a number of these pictures that were not in the magazine came along and I could not help myself – had to add nearly all of them! After 2 months of nearly nothing from us, we hope you take your time and savour all this beauty and the article with so many things about Alex that we know so well from way back 6 years ago, even before he settled down with his wife and family in Hawaii.. It contains a few of my favourite Alex quotes.

Alex O’Loughlin –Actor of the Year.

How does a battler go from labouring on Canberra’s building sites to living the showbiz dream in Hawaii? Hard work, steely resilience and a very Australian sense of humour.

For GQ Australia
By: Richard Clune
Photographer: Dusan Reljin
Model: Alicia Hall

The sun’s final dance of the day melts into the horizon as Alex O’Loughlin straddles his surfboard at the back of a gentle Hawaiian break, chatting to a surfer who recognises him from Hawaii Five-0, the TV series that delivered him to the archipelago 18 months ago.

It’s been six years since this high-school dropout from Canberraarrived in the City Of Angels. The only surfing back then was from couch to couch, crashing with mates until an eventual call-up. That initial luck fell flat, with his first two shows cancelled. But then came the reboot of an iconic ’70s staple, an updated boys-own adventure that had O’Loughlin taking the baton from Magnum, P.I. in fighting crime — often shirtless — around Honolulu.

We sit down with O’Loughlin back on dry land — with his shirt firmly on.

GQ: Is it true you once wanted to fly planes?

Alex: Yeah, I was in kindergarten and the teacher asked what we wanted to do when we grew up. I said, “I want to be a fighter pilot.” She stopped in front of my desk and said, “Haven’t you got asthma?”
I said, “Yeah”. She said, “Well, you’ll never be a fighter pilot.”

GQ: Wow, that’s harsh.

Alex: I was crushed. And I never pursued a career in the skies.

GQ: Still, aviation’s loss was acting’s gain. How did you end up going that way?

Alex: I did my first play at primary school. I was about 10; I’ll never forget it. When I walked out under the lights and the audience was paying attention, I just got it. But I didn’t really think it was something I could do.

GQ: Why not?

Alex: I was a working-class kid and I saw acting as a middle-class profession. So I went off and did a lot of other things. I was interested in building, in fact I loved it. I worked on a lot of houses and offices and it was good. It meant I could get my physical thing on and see something emerge. I also worked in hospitality. I once worked for Neil Perry as a barman and a waiter.

Original – @Mymaximus

GQ: So when you decided to try out for NIDA, your main acting experience was from primary school?

Alex: I had no technical skills. I didn’t know what I was doing, but when it felt right it came from an instinct and I think people saw that. And passion. If I ever lose that passion I think I’ll change career.

GQ: Are you ambitious?

Alex: It can be a very ugly word, especially in this business. But I’ve always had a lot of drive. Whether I was working on a building site or auditioning or moving to the US, I’ve always done it with all of my heart. I don’t know how to do it any other way.

GQ: Hawaii Five-0 came on the back of two high-profile cancellations — Moonlight and Three Rivers. Did you fear coming back home a failure?

Alex: I did — on a couple of levels. Of course, there was the pride level about coming home to my fellow Aussies telling me, “Hey, you thought you were special, didn’t ya?” But much more significantly, I felt that fundamentally I was a failure. That I didn’t have what it took to cut it, that I wasn’t good enough or smart enough. That thought was the most distressing of all. The thought I mightn’t be able to make any sort of living from it was very upsetting.

GQ: How do you feel about working in such a cutthroat business?

Alex: At the end of the day, I’m either an asset or a liability. I’m either making money or I’m not. You can’t take it personally. That’s a mistake a lot of young actors make when they come to Hollywood. They fall into that trap of believing they’re special. Sure, they might be but…

GQ: …they’re probably not. but what about you?

Alex: Look, I don’t think I’m massively talented but I have a clear understanding of how it all works. And I work really hard. I work my arse off.

GQ: Well, it’s certainly paying off. How do you feel about the fame that comes with your level of success?

Alex: I don’t get it. Especially now I’ve had a little taste of it. I’m fascinated by the pathology of someone who wants to be famous — I am so far away from that. It fucking terrifies me. I’m getting anxious just talking about it.

GQ: You’ve said before that you love movies. Do you worry about being pigeonholed as a small-screen player?

Alex: Absolutely. TV scares the shit out of me. With all due respect, it’s a business about numbers and how many people are watching. When you work in the system the way I do at the moment, occasionally you come across material that can seem like you’re going to compromise your integrity as an artist by participating in it. That’s scary because you think, ‘How am I going to make it out of TV alive?’ But there are other things to take into account. I’m 35 years old and I’ve got a 14-year-old son [Saxon, who lives with his mother in Australia].

GQ: What’s he like?

Alex: He’s the best 14-year-old around. I want him to have every opportunity I ever had and the ones I didn’t. I’m grateful for the job — this is me simply [reflecting] about my career and how I feel. I’d never have turned the Five-O job down because it was too good, but you do stop taking risks after a while — when you say, “I need to get some money in the bank and have a solid home for my family.”

Original from @Mymaximus

GQ: If you don’t mind us saying so, you’re looking very buff, good sir. Would you be willing to share your body-shaping tricks?

Alex: For me to work an 80-hour week is not crazy, so it’s all about getting it in when I can. I surf and do jujitsu and try to change it up a lot. 
I really like running, but when I work out, essentially I circuit train, keep my heart rate up and hit it as hard as I can. I just want to stay at that shape and stay strong.

GQ: Fighting beachside crime means you get to show off your impressive collection of tatts, too.

Alex: Man, tattoos are cool! They’re something that started in the folly of youth and there’s been a progression ever since. I love the outward expression, but there was a period where I was judged, because they weren’t part of popular culture, like they are now. Back then, tattoos meant you’d either been to prison or you were in some sort of gang. I had that conversation with so many girlfriends’ parents, explaining that I wasn’t a felon or a Hells Angel!

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Title: War Brides
Author: darkseraphina
Fandom: NCIS/Criminal Minds
Prompt: Rule 63

Characters/Pairings: Spencer Reid/Aaron Hotchner, Antonia DiNozzo/Steve McGarrett
Genre: historical AU (yes, really)
Word Count: 1990
Notes: So, I wrote a historical AU. And a Rule 63 story. At the same time. This is what happens when you spend time reorganizing a history section in a bookstore. I have no regrets. More seriously, I’m Canadian and that means that war brides are a large part of the post-WWII identity of my country; more than 40,000 brides from Britain and thousands more from Germany, the Netherlands, France, Italy, and other nations immigrated to Canada in the years after the war. Some faced poverty, others rural isolation; some faced abuse and suffering. And some made happy lives, despite the strange circumstances and the difficulties of a world recovering from war.

Synopsis: They were more fortunate than most, even far from home and soon to reach a strange country.



They were luckier than most.

It was an odd thing to think, hundreds of miles from home while on their way to a new country to meet husbands they hadn’t seen in years. They’d been at sea for days and the war was barely over.

Still, they were lucky for the war was over and they had survived as had the men they’d wed days before being sent to the front lines. Though they were sailing to a new land, it was one that spoke the same language as their own. Their families were an ocean behind them but they’d found a friend in each other to ease fear and homesickness.

Spencer leant against the railing of RMS Queen Elizabeth, watching the dark smudge of land along the horizon. She’d calculated their position based on estimated speed and her knowledge of nautical charts; they were past the coast of Canada and soon to pass Boston, the final leg of the trip between Southampton and New York.

“Almost there,” Nina said softly, round tones giving away her upper-class breeding. Spencer’s accent was pure London despite years at Oxford, first under the guardianship of her mentor, Dr Gideon, and later as a student of mathematics. It wasn’t her accent that had drawn looks then, but her age and gender; women were permitted within the hallowed halls of Oxford but only begrudgingly, and sixteen-year-old girls more so than most.

When war broke out it hadn’t mattered that she was nineteen and female to the War Office. Her gender was a blessing for once, as it meant one less man pulled from the front lines to do the work needed at Bletchley Park. Spencer had been challenged, by both the work and the people, but there was nothing she regretted from her time there.

It was at Bletchley that she’d met Aaron, an American army captain attached to the War Office as an interrogator. It was in the nearby village that she’d married him, two years after their first meeting and two days before he was sent to rejoin the Americans, seven weeks before Normandy.

It was September 17, 1946. Spencer Hotchner had last seen her husband in April of 1944.

She touched a creased letter in her skirt pocket. It was the last of many sent over the years, having arrived only days before she boarded the ship. “Yes, almost.”

Nina leant back against the rail, arms draped across it as she lifted her face; the sun was thin, but it was there. For days the ship had been battered by storms, forcing them to stay inside and many to battle seasickness. That wasn’t a problem for her, not after years spent flying everything from Tiger Moths to Spitfires.

She was the granddaughter of an Earl and Italian immigrants; raised amid grand rooms and manicured gardens and expected to marry well. The Paddingtons wished for a well-connected husband while her father wanted him to be rich. Antonia, called Nina, had never concerned herself with a wealthy life, only one that was hers.

When the war started, she hadn’t joined a women’s organization as a director, the way Peeresses and their daughters had; she hadn’t signed up as an ambulance driver like Princess Elizabeth. She’d joined the Air Transport Auxiliary and learned to fly.

It had horrified her cousin Crispian and worried her Uncle Clive, but Nina had done right by her country and enjoyed herself immensely. The work was hard and dangerous, but they’d made the most of every day, and even more of the nights.

It was on such a night that she’d met Steven, a Navy officer. They’d been celebrating in the pub and he had offered a truly terrible line only to make up for it by buying a round. He’d also known how to dance, which Nina found terribly attractive in a man. They’d been married a month later.

When he’d been sent to Sicily, she’d gone three months without a word; more than once she’d found an S. McGarrett on the casualty lists but always of a different rank or nationality. The letter that finally arrived had mentioned that he’d been ‘a little shot up, but fine’ and little else. Her blistering response had threatened to set the mailbag on fire and ensured he’d never gone more than two weeks between letters again.

A child ran by, obviously enjoying some time above deck, mother following and calling in French. Nina and Spencer grinned; as they both understood French, they caught the woman’s creative scolding. Of the hundreds of women and children on board, less than half were English.

“Are you frightened?”

“Running into a Jerry on reconnaissance while you’re flying with empty guns is frightening.”

“Nina.”

“Terrified,” she admitted. “And you? I’ve more time to wait, but you’ll meet Aaron again soon.” Having been discharged, Aaron lived in the Capitol as a barrister. The trip to New York was only the first part of Nina’s journey; she would take a train to San Francisco, then another ship to Honolulu.

“His mother is going to hate me,” Spencer mumbled.

“Probably,” Nina said cheerfully, ignoring Spencer’s frown. “A posh bird from another country who stole her lad’s heart and left him to pine all this time? Fortunately, your husband doesn’t live with his mother. Think about how many women on this ship will be living in the same house as their mother-in-law, and be grateful.”

“I’m grateful he lives in a city, one with libraries. I like a ramble in the countryside as much as anyone,” Spencer admitted, “but I’m not interested in living there.”

“Countryside means something quite different for us than Americans, but I agree; the first thing I asked Steven when he asked for a dance was if he was a farmer.”

“Nina.”

Unashamed, Nina shrugged. “Better to be rude than to fall in love with a man whose life would make you miserable. Don’t frown at me, you had the sense to marry a barrister.”

Since it was true, Spencer only asked: “Are you packed?”

Many war brides carried only a single bag with them as they joined their husbands, but they were more fortunate. Nina’s family and Spencer’s husband both had money enough to pay for passage rather than depending on the government. Instead of only what they could carry, they were able to bring all their belongings.

Well, most; Spencer would have to wait and have her books sent by packet later.

“I’m ready to get off this boat as soon as we land,” Nina agreed.

The waters grew busy as other vessels became more common; fishing and transport, steam and sailboats grew numerous. The decks grew crowded with women and children who watched as their new home grew closer. Crewmen made the rounds, warning of the coming landfall. A few left to gather belongings but most stayed, waiting and watching.

“Oh,” Nina said quietly beneath the shouts and cheers in multiple languages; Spencer clutched the railing. The Statue of Liberty was larger than they’d expected, rising above the sea and city beyond her. Her face appeared solemn and kind.

As they drew closer to port, both women retreated to their berth to collect their suitcases and their composure.

“How long to unload the baggage, do you think?” Spencer asked as they descended the gangplank; around them, chaos reigned. Spencer gripped the handle of her suitcase as she watched the exuberant greetings and kisses playing out. There was a crowd of onlookers and even photographers nearby, and wasn’t sure if she was grateful not to be part of the spectacle or saddened; there was still a train journey to Washington D.C.

“In this? At least an hour, then we’ll have to arrange to get the trunks on the right trains.” Nina eyed the crowd with a faint smile and dark eyes, for it reminded her of the Victory Day celebrations, right down to the sailors dipping women back in enthusiastic kisses. “We might find a place to sit, or better still, to have a bite to eat.”

“You can still take the train to Washington, and then go to San Francisco from there.”

“Spencer, I doubt either of you wants a house guest on your first night together since D-Day.”

“You can find a hotel if you insist,” Spencer cajoled. “You were of staying a night here before going on; why not Washington?”

Nina linked their arms and drew Spencer through the crowd. “We’ll see. You know what I’m looking forward to most?”

“Not in public, Nina,” Spencer blushed.

“Do you know what I look forward to almost as much as that? No rationing.”

“Sugar for tea,” Spencer sighed. “Bacon for breakfast.”

“And fruit instead of jam. Steve told me that you can buy pineapples and bananas in every greengrocer on the island.” It had been years since she’d had a banana, and only ever canned pineapple. Even oranges had been rare since the war began, the risks of shipping too great for luxury items. Apples and fruit from gardens and hedgerows made into preserves had been the order of the day.

A letter describing Hawaii was carefully folded among many in her case and while Steven was quite awful with words, he managed to summon some eloquence in writing as well as private moments. Lush green forests and crystal blue seas, white sand and warm sun; he obviously loved his home.

“Spencer.”

She glanced around at her name; it wasn’t common and was usually someone calling a last name rather than her. This time, however . . . “Oh.”

Nina chuckled and took her case from her hand, then gave her a little nudge. “Go on, then.”

“He wasn’t supposed to be here.”

“Well, go tell him that.”

It was odd to see him in a dark suit rather than a uniform, but his face seemed the same. A few creases near his eyes and a scar on his jaw that she could see up close, but otherwise as the picture in her pocketbook showed. And just like she remembered, he showed little of what he thought in his face and everything in his eyes.

“You weren’t — what are you doing here?” she managed then blushed. Hardly a warm greeting.

Aaron smiled. “I missed you.”

She took the last few steps and wrapped her arms around him; his came up to hold her tightly. “I missed you, too.”

Nina smiled and turned away to give them privacy, though she doubted they’d do anything half so demonstrative as those around them. Spencer described her husband as restrained, and she was rather contained as well. Around them, husbands and wives, parents and children were still connecting as the business of unloading a ship went on around them.

She and Spencer were the lucky ones. For every kiss, there was a stilted greeting; for every warm hug, a loveless one. Nina would lay a pound for a pence that at least one woman here had been widowed and not yet gotten word, and was now without husband or money in a foreign land. Plenty had married in haste and would now have time to repent, and there were surely men who’d all but forgotten they were married.

Spencer’s husband was speaking quietly in her ear and, based on the women’s blush, it was something loving or carnal. Nina rather hoped it was both for Spencer was charming and so terribly serious. Regardless, there was no repenting there. As for herself, Steven’s letters were as full of wistfulness and longing as ever, so she didn’t think he’d forgotten her. She would go to the other side of the world and make a home with him and, if it didn’t work, she had three hundred pounds hidden in her case and a bank draft for more from her grandfather.

“Nina?”

She turned away from the crowds towards her friend, and let her stern husband take the luggage.




Note: Yes, I used Nina as a nickname instead of Toni. Context matters, and fashion changes. Try to picture a young woman, growing up in the 1920’s in Britain with an upper-class family being called ‘Toni’. And that’s before the whole ‘we’re at war with Italy’ element. Nina is a nickname for women’s names that start with N or end with ‘-nia’ and is well-known in Britain.

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NEW Hawaii Five-0